Grim Reaper Rabbits: Art Inspired by Watership Down

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When English author Richard Adams imbued a bunny bunch with human political struggles, heroic happenings, and folklore for his 1972 novel Watership Down , he saturated children’s dreams with the horrors of the Black Rabbit of Inlé. The sinister phantom death hare, in all its metaphorical mythology, is also mighty good fodder for tribute art. Click through to preview just some of 100 works on display — like Travis Louie‘s signature anthropomorphism portraiture, a pink fluffy reaper from street-credited artist Buff Monster, a Victorian touch from risque graphic novelist Molly Crabapple, and more. INLE, 100 Artists Interpret the Anti-hero of Richard Adam’s Watership Down is on view at Los Angeles’s Gallery 1988 Melrose through April 8th.

Joe Vaux, Under The Iron Paw. Courtesy Gallery 1988

Audrey Kawasaki, I Won’t Forget You. Courtesy Gallery 1988

Buff Monster, Bunny Reaper. Courtesy Gallery 1988

Sergio Hernandez, Grandpa Telling Us Stories. Courtesy Gallery 1988

Christian Rex Van Minnen, Lion Ache With Rabbit. Courtesy Gallery 1988

Dabs & Myla, It’s Coming Down. Courtesy Gallery 1988

Johnny KMNDZ Rodriguez, Presto. Courtesy Gallery 1988

Shawn Barber, Skinned Rabbit. Courtesy Gallery 1988

Travis Louie, General Woundwort. Courtesy Gallery 1988

Molly Crabapple, Day and Night. Courtesy Gallery 1988

Bob Dob, Inle. Courtesy Gallery 1988.

Kris Lewis, We Ride Tonight. Courtesy Gallery 1988

Greg “Craola” Simkins, The Elil And Fu Inle. Courtesy Gallery 1988

Nate Van Dyke, Death of Hazel. Courtesy Gallery 1988