Diego Gravinese’s Strange, Surreal Photorealistic Paintings

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Photorealistic painting is most often a literal interpretation of the world as the artist observes it onto the canvas. Because it’s so straightforward, the style can get a little old, so we’re always excited to see painters trying something new with it. Beautiful/Decay points us to the work of Diego Gravinese, an Argentinean painter who injects glimpses of the bizarre into the most quotidien of scenes: A couple is in bed, in an otherwise normal room where crystals are growing out of the floor and ceiling; a woman stands at the edge of a beautiful body of water, staring out at an airplane that appears to be dropping bombs. Wander through Gravinese’s familiar yet strange world after the jump, then visit his website to see more.

Diego Gravinese, The Duration of Promises, oil on canvas, 71” x 55.2”

Diego Gravinese, Hercules, oil on canvas, 71” x 55.2”

Diego Gravinese, Alena of the Crystals, oil on canvas, 39.3” x 23.6”

Diego Gravinese, In Jessicaland, acrylic and oil on canvas, 43.3” x 67”

Diego Gravinese, After the Gold Rush, oil on canvas, 71” x 55.2”

Diego Gravinese, Mimesis, oil on canvas, 47.2” x 71”

Diego Gravinese, The Method, oil on canvas, 47.2” x 71”

Diego Gravinese, The Offering, oil on canvas, 55” x 43.3”

Diego Gravinese, Miami, oil on canvas, 59” x 59”

Diego Gravinese, Milk Girl, oil on canvas, 27.5” x 40”

Diego Gravinese, Pop Corn, oil on canvas, 22” x 16”

Diego Gravinese, Easy, pencil on paper, 27.5” x 35.4”