Amazing LEGO Creations in Unlikely Places

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This year marks the 50th anniversary of LEGO arriving in Australia, and to honor the fun, versatile bricks that made life more colorful and inventive, life-size LEGO lands are being installed in various locations all over the continent as part of the Festival of Play. After spotting the life-size LEGO garden that popped up in a remote mining town in the Australian Outback over on Juxtapoz, we couldn’t help but wonder if anyone else was playing around with extra-large versions of our favorite Danish-designed interlocking construction blocks. From a life-size forest of iconic LEGO pine trees to a LEGO bridge to a LEGO house with a working bathroom, click through to check out what the world might look like if dreams came true and it was made out of LEGOS.

LEGO Forest — Broken Hill Desert, Australia

Image credit: Broken Hill

As the website of the popular Outback destination explains, the “the Forest consists of 15 of the iconic LEGO ‘pine’ trees scaling 4 metres in height and 15 flower sets. The LEGO Forest trees and flowers are 1:1 in ratio replicas of the original iconic pieces, but over 66 times bigger in size to make the magical play world a reality.”

LEGO Forest — Sydney, Australia

Image credit: Festival of Play

Before the Forest appeared in Broken Hill, it popped up in a pedestrian mall in Sydney. A major feature of LEGO’s Festival of Play, the traveling forest is making its way around the continent. Hmmm, can it wander stateside?

Image credit: Lukas Power and Rolf Dellenbusch via Colossal

Known for installing larger than life toys and games in the streets, the artist MEGX painted a bridge in Wuppertal, Germany to look as if it had been built out of giant LEGOS.

LEGO House — Surrey, England

Image credit: Apartment Therapy; DJ Storm

The two-story LEGO house complete with working LEGO bathroom was built by James May (with 2000 volunteers) for the BBC 2 show, Toy Stories. Using 3.3 million LEGO bricks, the fabulous feat was sadly demolished when — after the show was completed — plans fell through to transport it to Legoland. According to the Telegraph, despite a final Facebook plea, no one came forward to take it on. So sad.

LEGO staircase — New York, New York

Image credit: Apartment Therapy; Leslie Saul

Built out of 20,000 LEGO bricks, this staircase in a Chelsea loft showcases a clever way to introduce a pop of color.

The Church of LEGO — Enschede, The Netherlands

Image credit:

This LEGO church isn’t actually a church. According to Gizmodo, it’s a “a public venue designed to celebrate all sorts of things, from town meetings to raves to Lego building contests.”

LEGO Skyscraper — Seoul, Korea

The world record holder for the tallest LEGO structure ever built, this colorful mini skyscraper was built in 5 days by 4,000 children with 50,000 bricks. Check out a video of the build over on Architizer.

LEGO furniture by LunaBlocks

Image credit: LunaBlocks via inhabitots

Wanted: really big LEGOs for grown-ups.

Dispatchwork

Image credit: Babble Tree

The artist Dispatch rounds up crews to patch our crumbling city streets with LEGOs. Brilliant.

Life-size LEGO BMW X1 replica — Munich, Germany

Image credit: Auto Motto

This is what you get when you give 800 kids four days and 165,000 LEGO bricks — plus a little bit of help from the German automaker’s staff.